Copyright
Like?

Comparative Advantage: Definition and Examples

Start Your Free Trial To Continue Watching
As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 8,500 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Plus, get practice tests, quizzes, and personalized coaching to help you succeed.
Free 5-day trial
It only takes a minute. You can cancel at any time.
Already registered? Login here for access.
Start your free trial to take this quiz
As a premium member, you can take this quiz and also access over 8,500 fun and engaging lessons in math, English, science, history, and more. Get access today with a FREE trial!
Free 5-day trial
It only takes a minute to get started. You can cancel at any time.
Already registered? Login here for access.
  1. 0:57 Comparative Advantage
  2. 1:30 Examining Opportunity Costs
  3. 4:31 Specialization
  4. 5:07 Absolute Advantage
  5. 8:21 Summary
Show Timeline
Taught by

Jon Nash

Jon has taught Economics and Finance and has an MBA in Finance

Understand the definition of comparative advantage, using two goods as an example.This key lesson incorporates the basic foundations of economics into one foundational theory explaining what goods and services that people and nations should produce and for whom they should produce it.

Comparative Advantage

In the late 1700s, the famous economist Adam Smith wrote this in the second chapter of his book The Wealth of Nations:

'It is the maxim of every prudent master of a family, never to attempt to make at home what it will cost him more to make than to buy...What is prudence in the conduct of every private family, can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom.'

He's observing two important principles of economics. The first one is that nations behave in the same way as individuals do: economically. Whatever is economical for people is also economical on a macroeconomic, or large, scale. The second thing he's observing is what we call the Law of Comparative Advantage. When a person or a nation has a lower opportunity cost in the production of a good, we say they have a comparative advantage in the production of that good.

Everyone has something that they can produce at a lower opportunity cost than others. This theory teaches us that a person or a nation should specialize in the good that they have a comparative advantage in.

Examining Opportunity Costs

So, let's explore this concept of comparative advantage using some examples from everyday life. For example, Sally can either produce 3 term papers in one hour or bake 12 chocolate chip cookies. Now let's add a second person, Adam, and talk about the same two activities, but as we'll see, Adam has different opportunity costs than Sally does. Adam is capable of producing either 8 term papers or 4 cookies in an hour. If we express both of these opportunity costs as equations, then we have:

For Sally, 3 term papers = 12 cookies.

For Adam, 8 term papers = 4 cookies.

We can ask two different questions about opportunity cost because we have two different goods. The first question we want to know is: what is the opportunity cost of producing 1 term paper? Reducing these equations down separately gives us:

For Sally, 1 term paper = 4 cookies. For Adam, 1 term paper = 0.5 cookies.

So, in this case, who has the lowest opportunity cost of producing 1 term paper? Adam does. Now, let's look at the same scenario from the opposite perspective and answer the second question: what is the opportunity cost of producing 1 cookie?

Now, I know that, in reality, no one is going to produce exactly 1 cookie unless it were a very, very big cookie, but when we reduce the equations down to 1 cookie, we can easily compare on an apples-to-apples basis (or cookie-to-cookie basis). So, let's take a look at the equations again:

For Sally, we have 12 cookies = 3 term papers.

For Adam, we have 4 cookies = 8 term papers.

Reducing these equations down gives us 1 cookie = 0.25 term papers for Sally, and for Adam 1 cookie = 2 term papers.

So, how do we decide who should produce term papers and who should be produce cookies? According to who has the lowest opportunity costs. That's what the law of comparative advantage says.

Who has the lowest opportunity cost of baking cookies? Sally does. Who has the lowest opportunity cost of producing term papers? Adam does.

So, we have two goods and two different people who have two different opportunity costs. The law of comparative advantage tells us that both of these people (Adam and Sally) will be better off if instead of both producing term papers and cookies, they decide to specialize in producing one good and trade with each other to obtain the other good.

This leads us to the conclusion that we should specialize. Individuals should specialize in the goods or services they produce. Firms and corporations should also specialize in what they have a lower opportunity cost of producing, and nations should specialize, as well. Whoever has the lowest cost relative to someone else can trade with them, and everyone gains something by trading.

Absolute Advantage

Now that we've explored the law of comparative advantage, we need to make an important distinction. When a person or country has an absolute advantage, that means they can produce more of a good or service with the same amount of resources than other people or countries can. Another way to say it is they can produce it more cheaply than anybody else. This is a measure of how productive a person or country is when they produce a good or service. For example, let's say that country A can produce a ton of wheat in less time than any other nation with the same amount of resources. In this case, country A has an absolute advantage in the production of wheat.

Let's take another look at Sally and Adam, this time from the perspective of their labor productivity. As you can see, it takes Sally a 1/4 hour to produce 1 cookie, which is lower than the 1 hour that it takes Adam. Therefore, Sally is the most productive. She has an absolute advantage in the production of cookies.

Unlock Content Over 8,500 lessons in all major subjects

Get FREE access for 5 days,
just create an account.

Start a FREE trial

No obligation, cancel anytime.

Want to learn more?

Select a subject to preview related courses:

People are saying…

"This just saved me about $2,000 and 1 year of my life." — Student

"I learned in 20 minutes what it took 3 months to learn in class." — Student

See more testimonials

Did you like this?
Yes No

Thanks for your feedback!

What didn't you like?

What didn't you like?

Next Video
Create your Account

Sign up now for your account. Get unlimited access to 8,500 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more.

Meet Our Instructors

Meet all 53 of our instructors