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Homogeneous Products: Definition, Lesson & Quiz

Instructor: Rodney Michael

Rodney has taught university accounting classes and has a doctorate in accounting.

This lesson will define homogeneous products and provide several examples. We will also explore the use of the term in different business-related disciplines.

We also recommend watching What Is the DSM? - Definition, Lesson & Quiz and Magma: Definition, Lesson & Quiz

What is a Homogenous Product?

A homogeneous product is one that cannot be distinguished from competing products from different suppliers. In other words, the product has essentially the same physical characteristics and quality as similar products from other suppliers. One product can easily be substituted for the other. To a buyer, this means that you cannot tell the difference between a product from ABC Company and one from XYZ Company.

Homogenous products
Homogeneous product - example

When you are shopping for product that happens to be homogenous, that means all versions of the product serve exactly the same purpose, and you likely don't care which one you use. Therefore, if you were shopping to buy the 'best' product, the only difference would be price. The term is usually applied to agricultural products, metal and energy-based commodities. For example, when you buy a bag of green apples, you likely don't know where they came from or who grew them (and you probably don't care). You base your selection on price alone.

In contrast, a heterogeneous product is readily distinguishable from competing products - they cannot be easily substituted for each other. As a buyer, this means that you have to decide which features are the most important to you. For example, physical characteristics for similar items may vary between suppliers. This means that advertising, brand names, packaging, warranties, and design elements such as color, size, and shape would influence your decision. The actual prices are likely to vary significantly from one product to another because the suppliers are able to make their product seem different from the competition.

Heterogenous products
Heterogeneous products

For example, to buyers, a Ford Mustang is easily distinguishable from a Chevrolet Camero, even though both are cars and serve the same basic function. Such things as advertising, brand loyalty, image, and exterior style would factor into a buyer's decision. Price alone would probably not be the most important factor in the purchase decision.

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