Automotive Title Clerk: Step-by-Step Career Guide

Automotive title clerks are responsible for the paperwork surrounding motor vehicle ownership, such as titles and registration. The position requires very little vocational training, and many automotive title clerks find employment at car dealerships. Find out how you can enter this career field.

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Step 1: Earn a High School Diploma

Depending on the employing company, a high school diploma may be the highest level of education needed for a job as an automotive title clerk. In fact, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) states that information clerks, which perform recordkeeping and preparation duties like automotive title clerks, commonly learn on the job. Regardless of whether or not a job seeker seeks additional vocational training, it is important to maintain a strong grade point average (GPA) because potential employers or training programs may reference this during the hiring process.

Step 2: Complete a Title Clerk Training Course

While training beyond a high school diploma may not be required for all automotive title clerk jobs, additional training can help set one job seeker above another. Automotive title clerk training courses may be completed in as little as a week or as long as 1-2 months, depending on the training service. Typically offered by automobile associations or at community college campuses or technical schools, these are often non-credit courses though some schools may offer a certificate program.

Step 3: Work as an Entry-Level Automotive Title Clerk

When first entering the job market as an automotive title clerk, job seekers can find entry-level positions at smaller car dealerships or assisting other title clerks. After gaining work experience at the entry level, an automotive title clerk may be eligible for advancement within the same company or a higher paying title clerk job elsewhere.

According to the BLS, information clerks are projected to see a 7% rise in employment from 2010 to 2020. While income may vary per duties, location and employer, in general, the median salary of information clerks was $37,240 in 2012, per the BLS.

Step 4: Work towards Advancement

While on the job it is extremely important for automotive title clerks to demonstrate organization. Since they handle legal documents dealing with vehicle registration and titling, it is crucial for paperwork to be submitted on time and filed appropriately. It is also important that automotive title clerks stay up to date with changing state laws and regulations regarding vehicle ownership. Staying current with the latest legislation and keeping an open line of communication with the local Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) can help ensure that an automotive title clerk is executing his or her job at the highest potential.

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