How to Become an Explosives Engineer: Step-by-Step Career Guide

Research the requirements to become an explosives engineer. Learn about the job description, and read the step-by-step process to start a career in explosives engineering.

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Requirements for Explosives Engineers

Explosives engineers, also called blasters, are responsible for explosives needed in mining, construction and other operations. Explosives are used to loosen and remove earth or rock in preparation for building or road construction. They can also be deployed to gain access to minerals, fuels or metals in the ground. Most positions require a high school diploma and experience in the industry, but formal education may be helpful in gaining employment or promotion. The following table outlines the core requirements for explosives engineers:

Common Requirements
Degree Level High school diploma or its equivalent*
Degree Fields Explosives engineering** or mining engineering***
Licensure Requirements vary by employer and region; federal and state licenses may be mandatory for explosives workers****
Experience 2+ years of experience in blasting/explosives operations****
Key Skills Strong oral and written communication, critical thinking and problem-solving abilities, knowledge of legal regulations and safety procedures*
Technical Skills Ability to handle and detonate explosives*
Additional Requirements Strong mathematical skills*

Sources: *O*Net Online, **Colorado School of Mines, ***University of Nevada-Reno, ****Office of Surface Mining.

Step 1: Complete an Educational Program

Most positions do not require a college degree, but students may choose to pursue certificate or degree programs in explosives engineering. Programs in a wider field such as mining engineering can also involve study of explosives. Courses may include principles of explosives engineering, drilling and blasting, rock fragmentation and commercial pyrotechnics operations. In lieu of a full college program, some organizations also offer training seminars and courses. Individual courses may last a few days and cover subjects such as surface blasting and explosives safety.

Success Tip:

  • Choose a career path. Requirements for explosives engineers vary by field and employer. The majority of blasters are employed in the mining industry and work with coal or metal ore mines. Other industries that employ explosives engineers include fabricated metal product manufacturing, specialty trade contracting and chemical product manufacturing.

Step 2: Earn a State License

Certification requirements vary by region and field. Work experience under a certified blaster may be a requirement for certification in order to become an explosives engineer. Applicants often need on-the-job training and up to 2 years of involvement in blasting operations before they are eligible for certification.

Explosives engineers in the mining industry need certification from the federal Office of Surface Mining. If the engineer is responsible for transporting explosives, a permit is required from the Department of Transportation. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives requires workers or their employers to have permits or licenses for all handling of explosives. States, counties and cities may have their own regulations for explosives engineers. The International Society of Explosives Engineers also offers certifications with the intent of establishing a training standard for the industry. Maintaining certification may involve completing a certain number of continuing education programs and training seminars within each renewal period.

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