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Logistics Manager: Education Requirements & Career Info

Logistics managers oversee and coordinate the storage, distribution and transportation of goods from manufacturing facilities to warehouses to final destinations. Logistics managers and other supply chain employees ensure these processes run smoothly and that products are sent where they are needed. Most logistics managers have bachelor's degrees, according to O*Net Online, though educational requirements vary.

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What Is Logistics Management?

Logistics managers, also called supply chain managers, direct the flow of raw materials, manufactured products and other goods from place to place. The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) explains that logistics managers provide the business management skills to link suppliers to consumers in the production of material goods by handling all the steps in between (www.careersinsupplychain.org). The CSCMP also states that logistics managers ensure that the right product, in the right quantity and condition, is delivered at the right place, at the right time, at the right cost, to the right customer. These professionals oversee:

  • Warehousing
  • Inventory control
  • Transportation
  • Materials handling
  • Strategic planning
  • Customer service

Educational Requirements to Become a Logistics Manager

The educational requirements to become a logistics manager vary by employer and industry; however, O*Net reported that 74% of logistics managers held a bachelor's degree as of 2011 (www.onetonline.org). The CSCMP recommended prospective logistics and supply chain managers acquire skills and knowledge needed for the job through internships and work experience; it also encouraged aspiring mangers to learn business skills and the details of the supply process. November 2011 job postings on CareerBuilder.com reflected varying educational requirements, ranging from a high school diploma to a bachelor's degree, all with some logistics and management experience. Additionally, job postings requested that applicants possess some industry-specific experience related to the products or goods they would be working with, since some industries are highly technical.

An associate's or bachelor's degree program in logistics, supply chain management, business administration or a related field can prepare graduates for a career in logistics management. Students learn the key concepts, strategies and processes of logistics, transportation and supply chain management by combining a business curriculum with focused coursework in supply chain topics. Coursework in logistics degree programs includes purchasing, global logistics, logistics operations, storage and distribution, economics, accounting and business law.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported in May 2012 that transportation, storage, and distribution managers earned an annual salary of $88,920, on average (www.bls.gov). This statistic includes logistics managers, although no specific salary on logistics managers was available from the BLS.

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