Paramedical Esthetics Training and Education Program Options

Learn about certificate and associate degree programs in paramedical esthetics. Read on to see enrollment requirements, coursework and licensing regulations.

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Essential Information

Paramedical esthetics, also called medical esthetics, clinical esthetics or camouflage therapy, is a field that provides skincare treatments to aid a patient's healing. Paramedical esthetics training programs are available at the certificate and associate degree levels, and they can prepare students for esthetician licensure, which some states require.

A certificate program is open to students with high school diplomas or GED certificates. It takes about two semesters to complete a certificate program, although many schools offer accelerated programs to licensed general estheticians that can be completed in less time. In these programs, students learn about skin diseases, infection control, cosmetics and chemical peels. Associate degrees are less common and are usually offered by for-profit schools. These 2-year programs cover many of the same topics as certificate programs.


Certificate in Paramedical Esthetics

Paramedical estheticians differ from traditional estheticians in that they regularly work with severely scarred skin, medical terminology, insurance billing issues and terminally ill patients. Clinical estheticians prepare patients for surgery, analyze complementary colors to skin and hair colors after changes due to chemotherapy and normalize physical appearance after a disfigurement. Techniques they use include chemical peels, lymphatic drainage massage, eyelash extensions and camouflage make-up.

Certificates take roughly two semesters to complete, though accelerated courses can take under four months to finish. Applicants to these programs must be high school graduates; however, accelerated programs require that applicants also have a current state-issued license to practice esthetics.

Program Coursework

Future clinical estheticians study skin diseases, chemical peels and color theory, in order to best treat patients' physical symptoms and improve their self-esteem after disfiguration. Topics of study include:

  • Business skills
  • Camouflage make-up
  • Infection control
  • Pharmacology
  • Skincare

Career Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), jobs for skincare specialists are projected to increase 25% between 2010 and 2020 (www.bls.gov). The BLS reported that the median annual salary for skin care specialists in May 2012 was $28,640.


Associate Degrees Paramedical Esthetics

Though rare, some colleges and vocational schools offer associate degree programs in paramedical esthetics, such as the Associate of Science (A.S.) in Natural Health with a concentration in advanced paramedical skin care or Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in Esthetician with a medical esthetician emphasis. Schools that do offer this training are typically for-profit schools, which may not transfer to related bachelor's degree programs.

Programs at associate level in this field can cover everything from nutrition to psychology and can take roughly two years to complete. Most schools do not have any additional prerequisites outside of high school diploma or GED equivalent.

Program Coursework

The goal of these programs is to equip paramedical students with skin care theory and techniques beyond introductory coursework. Emphasis will be placed on areas applicable to cosmetic surgery, reconstructive surgery, dermatopathology and camouflage makeup, as well as classes similar to the following:

  • Advanced skin care peels
  • Chemistry
  • Clinical dermatology
  • Dermal oncology
  • Medical terminology
  • Microdermabrasion
  • Nutrition
  • Psychology
  • Relaxation techniques

Continuing Education and Licensure

Medical skin care specialist programs are designed for estheticians interested in working in a clinical setting. Coursework is found at the certificate level and teaches students advanced skin care as well as medical terminology and the legal side of working in medical offices.

While all paramedical professionals work under a doctor's guidance, some states do not recognize a difference between paramedical and general estheticians. According to the National Society of Paramedical Esthetic Professionals (NSPEP), paramedical clinical estheticians are state-licensed professionals, while non-licensed estheticians working in a physician's office are called paramedical esthetic professionals (www.nspep.com). The state board of cosmetology runs licensing examinations; however, requirements vary by state.

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  • Minimum eligibility requirements:
    • Admissions Requirements Vary By Campus
    School locations:
    • Florida (3 campuses)

    Classroom-Based Programs

    • Non-Degree
        • Esthetics (Skin Care)

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Other Schools:

  • School locations:
    • Puerto Rico (1 campus)
    Areas of study you may find at D'Mart Institute include:
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    Areas of study you may find at Vatterott College include:
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    Areas of study you may find at Concorde School of Hair Design include:
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    Areas of study you may find at Stanford University include:
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    Areas of study you may find at Harvard University include:
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