Pediatric RN: Job Description, Duties and Requirements

Pediatric registered nurses (RNs) focus on the medical needs and treatment of infants, children and adolescents. Their specialized training allows them to provide young patients and their families with emotional support, as well as medical care. Pediatric nurses are required to complete undergraduate nursing programs and pass national licensing exams before practicing.

View 14 Popular Schools »

Job Description for a Pediatric RN

A pediatric RN assists pediatricians by assessing a patient's needs and providing initial patient care. They help families deal with a child's illness or injury and often offer information on nutrition, diet and good health habits. Pediatric RNs may work in a doctor's office, clinic or outpatient care center, immunization center or hospital. Work hours vary depending on the facility.

Job opportunities for all registered nurses, including pediatric nurses, are expected to grow 19% between the years 2012 and 2022, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov). This source also indicated that RNs earned $66,220 as a median annual wage as of 2013.

Duties of a Pediatric RN

Pediatric RNs have many duties. They often document a patient's symptoms and medical history for the doctor to review. They also draw blood, administer medication and give childhood vaccinations. Pediatric RNs might also assist a pediatrician during a patient examination. Additional duties result from further specialization, such as pediatric oncology, dermatology or cardiology.

Requirements to Practice as a Pediatric RN

Students interested in becoming registered nurses can choose from three nursing education options: a bachelor's degree, an associate degree or a diploma program. These educational alternatives take 2-4 years to complete. General requirements for graduation include classes in anatomy, biology, chemistry and nursing theory. Becoming a pediatric RN requires clinical work specializing in pediatric care.

Licensing and Certification

All RNs must pass the National Council of State Boards of Nursing's National Council Licensure Examination for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN) in order to receive a license practice. States may have different additional licensing requirements, so candidates should consult state nursing boards for specifics.

Although not required, the Certified Pediatric Nurse credential, offered by the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board, can benefit pediatric RNs by demonstrating their advanced knowledge and professional dedication to employers. This certification might also result in advancement or higher wages for those who hold it. In order to qualify, certification candidates are required to have a current nursing license and 1,800 hours of work in a pediatric clinic (www.pncb.org).

Show me popular schools

Related to Pediatric RN: Job Description, Duties and Requirements

  • Related
  • Recently Updated
  • Popular
Become a Pediatric Oncologist: Education and Career Roadmap

Find out how to become a pediatric oncologist. Research the education and training requirements, and learn about the experience...

Become a Pediatric Pathologist: Step-by-Step Career Guide

Research the requirements to become a pediatric pathologist. Learn about the job description and read the step-by-step process...

Pediatric Anesthesiologist: Salary, Career and Education Info

Pediatric anesthesiologists specialize in working with patients 21 years of age and under, providing them with pain relief...

How to Become a Pediatric Doctor: Education and Career Roadmap

Learn how to become a pediatric doctor. Research the education and career requirements, licensing and certification...

Pediatric Clinical Pharmacist: Education and Career Roadmap

Popular Schools

Popular Schools

Avg. Wages For Related Jobs

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Copyright