Copyright

Correctional Officer Training and Schooling Requirements

Correctional officers maintain order, enforce rules and control the inmates of correctional facilities. They may also need to supervise trustees, transport inmates and respond to emergency situations. Correctional officer training usually results in a certificate or diploma. Growing prisoner populations and an increase in mandatory sentencing means increased job security for correctional officers.

View 20 Popular Schools »

Correctional Officer Training Overview

Correctional officer training is usually provided by trade schools and community colleges, but is also provided by local, state or federal departments of corrections training facilities. Programs usually culminate in a certificate, but associate's and bachelor's degrees are offered in criminal justice. Most training programs are based on American Jail Association (AJA) guidelines as well as those of the American Correctional Association (ACA). Local and state correctional facilities usually hire correctional officers and give them on-the-job training during a probationary period. The length of this probationary period varies by state.

Topics of study in correctional officer and criminal justice programs include correctional rules and regulations, institutional policies, security measures, custody procedures and defensive tactics. Individuals hoping to become part of tactical response teams within correctional facilities might take specialized courses in hostage negotiations, riot situations, forced inmate moves and firearms training. They may learn to disarm prisoners, use chemical agents appropriately and manage dangerous situations. Additional subjects may include first aid, emergency preparedness, criminal justice communications and inmate searches.

Schooling Requirements

The Federal Bureau of Prisons requires a bachelor's degree for entry-level correctional officers along with three years of practical experience; it may accept a combination of the two. Most correctional agencies require some schooling, but others will accept law enforcement or military training as a substitute. Certain correctional officer certificate programs require students to complete internships in approved correctional situations. Some correctional officer and criminal justice training programs require that students be at least 19 before they graduate; some institutions have specific age requirements for new employees.

Show me popular schools

Related to Correction Officer's Colleges

  • Related
  • Recently Updated
  • Popular
Correction Officer: How Do I Become a Correctional Officer

Learn how to become a correctional officer. Research the education and career requirements, training information and experience...

Detention Officer Training Program Information

Detention officer duties are similar to correctional officer duties; however, detention officers specifically work in...

Federal Correctional Officer Training Program Information

Federal correctional officers monitor inmates and facilitate the day-to-day operations of federal penitentiaries. Although most...

Correctional Officer (County Jail): Educational Requirements

Careers in corrections and detention can be challenging. County jail correctional officers book, supervise and transport...

Be a Certified Correctional Officer: Step-by-Step Career Guide

Popular Schools

Popular Schools

Avg. Wages For Related Jobs

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics